Arlington Cat Clinic

841 North Wilke Road
Arlington Heights, IL 60005

(847)398-3355

arlingtoncatclinic.com

AGING

Cats usually live longer than most dogs and it is no longer unusual for them to live until 20 or beyond. How long an individual cat will live depends on many factors such as genetics, whether kept indoors or not, type of diet and of course the appropriate veterinary care he/she receives.

The rule of thumb is that at about age 7, a cat is considered to be middle-aged. At age 10 and above, a cat is considered to be mature. Over 15-17 they qualify as a geriatric kitty.

cat     

human 

cat 

human 

cat 

human 

1 

15 

 7 

44

 13 

 68 

 2 

24

 8 

48

 14 

 72 

3

28

9

 52

15

76

4

32

 10

 56

16

 80

5

36

 11

 60

17

 84

6

 40 

 12

  64 

18

 88

   

       One year for a cat is equivalent to four human years. Many changes can take place in what for us, is a fairly short period of time. That is why the American Veterinary Medical Association as well as the American Association of Feline Practitioners now recommend twice yearly physical exams plus appropriate blood work on all cats who are 7-8 years old or above.

   Arlington Cat Clinic recommends a physical exam every 6 months for our geriatric cats, including:
      *blood pressure
      *urinalysis
      *complete blood count
      *blood profile/thyroid function test

Hopefully many health problems which are not readily detected in other ways can be caught early on and appropriate steps taken to ensure continued well-being and a longer life for your cat.

WHAT'S IN AN ANNUAL PHYSICAL EXAM?

It includes an evaluation of the overall appearance of the cat - weight, demeanor, respiration, hair coat

                Eyes - clear, discharge, redness, discoloration of the iris, pupil size

                Ears - cleanliness, ear mites, yeast, wax, growths

                Nose - discharge, congestion

                Mouth/throat - inflammation, condition of teeth, growths

                Heart and lungs - irregularities, abnormal rate, murmurs, abnormal lung sounds

                Neck - palpate for thyroid tumors, lymph node size

    Abdomen - palpate for liver and kidney size, masses, consistency of stool, size of bladder.  May be impossible in obese cats

    Skin - fleas, hair thickness, scabs, irregularities in skin (growths), dryness, matting

    Weight - thin, ideal or overweight.  Weight changes are subtle and usually not noticed by the owner until drastic changes have occurred.